Promises, Promises

The Conservative party are getting the most of the political coverage in the media – with the Hunt versus Johnson shoot-out. A contest that seems one-sided but is, at least, making the candidates face their membership directly while getting them out of the Westminster village straight jacket.

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But they are not the only party with leadership contest activity. The LibDems are also trying to choose between Jo Swinson and Sir Ed Davey to take over from Vince Cable. Meanwhile in the Labour camp Jezza Corbyn is using all his youthful charisma to keep himself as leader – despite media reports of civil servants briefing against him. Surprisingly the Brexit Party leadership are not being attacked for once. But then quite a few of them are now out of London; busy trying to get to grips with their new – but temporary – home at EU HQ.

So that makes at least six politicians all wanting to move into 10 Downing Street in the near future. Hopefully all the current hustings will be over within a few weeks – and we will then have a single, clear leader who can take us forward. And forward at a much faster pace – and with real commitment – on a path of democratic freedom and independence. Sadly this could all get bogged down by no confidence votes and a subsequent general election.

However these British manoeuvres seem rather parochial when compared to the eurocrats efforts to get their men into the top jobs. When it comes to inter-european political deals the Brussels incumbents are the equivalent of chess grand masters. Let’s hope we can escape while they are looking the other way …

Get On With It

British politics continues to gyrate in ever decreasing circles through arcane – and somewhat irrelevant – procedures that seem to be designed to make mountains out of proverbial mole-hills.

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Getting Mrs May out of office has taken far too long – even when she was clearly making a complete hash of the job. Crazily she has resigned but is still in Downing Street and looking to commit billions of our taxes to her pet projects. Someone has to say no.

Appointing a replacement has already taken weeks and could well run on until the start of the summer break – meaning nothing useful may get done before September. Why does it take weeks for Conversative party offices to vote? Even the Euro elections only take a few days.

By then we will have around eight weeks to the next EU crunch date – 31-Oct-2019 – and the opposition will be pushing for a general election – so it is quite possible that the next Prime Minister could set a record for the shortest spell in office. And the general public will still be waiting for our politicians to honour their promise of implementing our decision to leave the EU that was made back in 2016.

BBC Sinks Even Further

This afternoon’s announcement that from 2020 UK residents over 75 will have to loose £154 from their pensions to pay for BBC excesses will not be greeted with much joy or support. Especially when the BBC clearly makes little attempt to produce quality content in the most cost-effective way.

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Even live sporting events have excessive numbers of pundits and reporters before, during and after every event. Some of these pundits taking away millions for just asking other pundits what they thought of the game. A game that the viewers had most likely just seen for themselves.

Meanwhile the BBC’s lead TV channel – BBC1 – is full of tired shows like Escape to the Country – which today has reached Season 17 Episode 37 for the second time – or daily quiz shows like Pointless; where today we have a repeat of Season 19 Episode 33!

To quote the BBC’s own blurb – The BBC is the world’s leading public service broadcaster. We’re impartial and independent, and every day we create distinctive, world-class programmes and content which inform, educate and entertain millions of people in the UK and around the world. And that means that UK tax payers – including pensioners – are funding television, radio and online on [in] more than 40 languages.

Coming so soon after that disastrous last place in the Eurovision Song Contest – where the BBC paid more that any other broadcaster to take part – the Beeb’s claim of world-class content has again been put into perspective. Australia’s public service broadcaster – SBS – has consistently produced better for less; much less. But then it does have to try harder – with no licence fee income to pay for programmes that are unappealing or expensive.

Now the BBC may not be any better if the channels presently paid for by the TV tax were switched to commercial funding. But the Corporation is, in effect, operating a business model that looses over £3,500 million per year – the amount it gets from taxation to make the books balance. Much of that loss is down to corporate obesity. Time for a corporate slimming plan …

Road To Freedom

Tomorrow will be the 75th anniversary of the start of the battle to free the occupied European states from German control. The Allied landings on the Normandy beaches marked the start of a long and costly campaign to liberate north-west Europe.

The invasion, if successful, would drain German resources and block access to key military sites. Securing a bridgehead in Normandy would allow the Allies to establish a viable presence in northern Europe. But it was not easy fight and over the weeks that followed the Battle of Normandy would incur the deaths of nearly 37,000 ground and over 16,000 air personnel for the invading forces.

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Of the five invasion beaches the landings at Omaha suffered the most casualties but none of them could be called, by any stretch of the imagination, painless. Over 425,000 Allied and German troops were killed, wounded or went missing during the landings and subsequent push inland.

Despite their tremendous costs in terms of lives and national wealth the invading Allies did not seek control over the countries they fought for. Instead they chose to restore these nations’ freedoms and encourage democratic governments.

How different it could all have been if the D-Day plans had failed – or if the USA and the British Commonwealth had opted to simply defend their homeland borders instead.